Workshop Descriptions & Bios


1. The Importance of Developing and Maintaining Relationships with Native Americans by Lori Edmo and Jake Fruhlinger
A discussion and presentation on the importance of agencies and Tribes maintaining and fostering a genuine lasting partnership that goes beyond politics, prioritize an ongoing relationship, and maintenance at the grass roots level and the barriers to these.

2. Our Ancestors Path by Louise Dixey
A presentation on the history of removal of the Shoshone and Bannock people from the Boise Valley.

3. Awakening Cultural Understandings by Johanna Jones
How can we acknowledging our inherent biases and understanding and change that narrative through culturally responsive practices and perspectives? How can we move forward?

4. Beyond the Reservation Gate by Antoinette Cavanaugh
Through the use of storytelling this workshop will explain how the reservation system has oppressed indigenous people, detail the challenges individuals have and must overcome while living in the reservation system, and discuss how the system in viewed today.

5. Story telling of Shoshoni Creation stories and Cultural beliefs of the Western Shoshoni People by Norm Cavanaugh
Exploring through story telling Shoshoni Creation stories and the cultural beliefs of the Western Shoshoni People.

6. Indigenous peoples in the Boise Valley by Lee Juan Tyler
A discussion on the indigenous peoples in the Boise Valley.

7. Urban Indian Practical Authority by Melanie Fillmore
Seeking to understand the Urban American Indian population this workshop will discuss The Native American Coalition of Boise (NACOB), the only local community organization in Boise, Idaho primarily serving urban American Indian residents and explore how the patterns of Colonization impact our local communities and how the Urban American Indian population have responded.

Speaker Biographies

1. The Importance of Developing and Maintaining Relationships with Native Americans by Lori Edmo and Jake Fruhlinger
Lori Edmo is the editor the Sho-Ban News – the weekly newspaper of the Shoshone-Bannock Tribes located in Fort Hall, Idaho. She is a graduate of the University of Montana, Missoula and has a Bachelor of Arts in Journalism. She served ten years on the Native American Journalists Association Board of Directors and two years on the Unity Journalists of Color Board of Directors. During the past 12 years, she has focused on learning more about her family history, culture and the Bannock language that is at risk of being lost. She’s a member of the regional Return of the Boise Valley People committee that focuses on public education of the true history of the Boise Valley. The ROBVP committee’s goal is to eventually build a cultural center in Boise to further their cause.
Jake Fruhlinger graduated in 1998 from Boise State University with a Bachelor’s Degree in Anthropology and In 2004 with a Master’s in Anthropology.  Fruhlinger has been the Cultural Resources Manager and Tribal Liaison for the Idaho National Guard and Idaho Office of Emergency Management since 2004 and is also Adjunct Faculty at Boise State University and the College of Western Idaho.  Fruhlinger teaches classes focused on Archaeology, Biological Anthropology, and Cultural Anthropology. Over the last decade, Leadership at the Idaho National Guard saw the importance of working alongside Tribes to develop a partnership rather than the typical Government to Government relationship that is all too common among most other agencies.  As the Tribal Liaison, Fruhlinger was tasked with developing a protocol that would take his agency beyond doing the bare minimum and instead, doing what is right.  As a result of this, over the last decade, Fruhlinger has been fortunate enough to come across some amazing programs that allow them to partner with Tribes and more importantly, develop lifelong friendships with some of the original inhabitants of the Boise Valley.

2. Our Ancestors Path by Louise Dixey
Louise E. Dixey
, a member of the Shoshone-Bannock Tribes, is a descendant of the Boise Valley Shoshone whom were marched from the Boise Valley to the Fort Hall Indian Reservation. She is a graduate of Idaho State University with a Bachelor’s degree in Political Science, she is currently employed as the Cultural Resources Director for the Shoshone-Bannock Tribes and is a student of the Bannock Language. Louise continues to research the history of the Shoshone and Bannock people whom were removed from the homelands throughout Idaho, Montana, Wyoming, Nevada, Utah and Oregon. Louise is married and has two adult daughters, five grandchildren, and one great grandchild. She and her husband Clyde are ranchers and take part in Tribal cultural activities and other ceremonies.

3. Awakening Cultural Understandings by Johanna Jones
Johanna J. Jones
is an involved citizen of the Seminole Nation of Oklahoma, from the Eufaula Band, and of the Ahv Cvmbv Clan. She received her traditional education in Seminole, Oklahoma and her formal education from Boise State University and Idaho State University. She has over 25 years in the field of education and currently directs the Office of Indian Education for the Idaho State Department of Education. Ms. Jones works closely with tribal communities, state agencies, and other entities to increase equity in educational access for American Indian students in the K-20 public school system through advocacy, policy interpretation and implementation, and strategizing resources. The enduring benchmarks which grounds the work of Ms. Jones are to support the highest quality of education, to leverage cultural knowledge and ways of knowing as indicators of academic success, and to promote culturally responsive pedagogy and practices. She holds a Bachelor of Arts in Education, a Masters of Arts in Curriculum and Instruction, and is in the dissertation stage of completing a doctorate in Higher Education Administration.

4. Beyond the Reservation Gate by Antoinette Cavanaugh
Antoinette Cavanaugh
has worked as an Independent Consultant since 2010 after retiring from the public education sector where she served as a teacher, school level and district administrator, and then, the Superintendent of Schools for Elko County School District in Nevada. She was named “Superintendent of the Year” in 2007 by the Nevada Association of School Boards. Her recent work in Northern Nevada has been focused on helping Native American youth to strategically prepare for post-high school education, counseling with Native higher education students to increase degree completion rates, hosting scholarship application workshops in rural communities, conducting systemic educational resource analysis for tribal entities for the Barrick Mining Company, and facilitating tribal/corporate dialogue meetings for Newmont Goldcorp. Her work with Native youth was featured in a special edition of Barrick’s Beyond Borders publication (2015) in an article entitled, “The Life Changer: Antoinette Cavanaugh inspiring Western Shoshone youth to Dream Big.” She was also featured as a “Noted Native Nevadan” at the National Indian Education Association Conference in October 2016 held in Reno, Nevada and again at the Nevada Legislature in 2017 during recognition of Native American month. Antoinette is a graduate from Boise State University and University of Nevada, Reno receiving the Outstanding Graduate Student from the Nevada Higher Education Board of Regents in 1995-96 while continuing coursework on her doctoral studies. Antoinette is married and has four children. She enjoys reading, beading and training for marathons during her free time.

5. Story telling of Shoshoni Creation stories and Cultural beliefs of the Western Shoshoni People by Norm Cavanaugh
Norm Cavanaugh hails from the Dosa Wihii (white knife/flint) band of the Western Shoshoni that roamed throughout Northern Nevada and Northeastern Idaho, including the Boise Valley prior to European settlements. His family was forcefully moved from the Battle Mountain, Nevada area along with other Bands of Shoshoni to Owyhee, Nevada (Duck Valley) Indian Reservation under Executive Order of the United States, President Grant in April 1877. As a child N. Cavanaugh’s Grandmother would share Creation stories about animals living on Mother Earth, Native Spirituality, Respect for all living beings and Cultural beliefs. N. Cavanaugh enjoys passing these stories of Shoshoni Creation and Cultural beliefs of the Western Shoshoni People on to those in his life. He also enjoys picking Natural Herbal plants in the wild for processing for food or medicine, teaching Shoshoni language to youth willing to learn, outdoors hiking or gathering of traditional foods, and gardening.

6. Indigenous peoples in the Boise Valley by Lee Juan Tyler
Lee Juan Tyler, as a member of the Fort Hall district, is serving his seventh term on Fort Hall Business Council. He is active in traditional and ceremonial ways of our people on the reservation and is frequently called upon to provide prayers and songs at local ceremonies and community events. Tyler is a fluent Shoshone speaker and is in support of revitalizing our Shoshone and Bannock languages. Tyler serves as the Tribes’ representative on the following committees: The Environmental Protection Agency’s (EPA) Regional Tribal Operations Committee (RTOC), the Tribal Science Council (TSC) which is under the umbrella of Environmental Protection Agency (EPA) to further tribal environmental objectives and to protect our ecosystems for future generations, as well, Tyler is an active member of the Upper Snake River Tribes Foundation (USRT) that consists of some of the Snake River Tribes. Tyler is the proud dad of one daughter and resides in the Fort Hall district.

7. Urban Indian Practical Authority by Melanie Fillmore
Melanie Fillmore is a Graduate Student of Political Science through the School of Public Service at Boise State University. She has been teaching courses about social change and politics and violence for 3 years and is culminating her degree work with a research project centered on The Native American Coalition of Boise (NACOB), the only local community organization in Boise, Idaho primarily serving urban American Indian residents. Her background is Urban Mixed Hunkpapa, Lakota from Pierre, South Dakota and has always been a part of Urban Indian communities.